Etymology
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snatch (v.)

early 13c., "make a sudden snap or bite" (at something), of uncertain origin; perhaps from an unrecorded Old English *snæccan or Middle Dutch snacken "to snatch, chatter." Compare snack (n.). Meaning "lay hold of suddenly" is from early 14c.; especially "take from someone's hands" (1580s). Weight-lifting sense is attested from 1928. Related: Snatched; snatching.

snatch (n.)

c. 1300, "a trap, snare," from snatch (v.). Meaning "a sudden grab" is from 1570s; that of "a small amount" is from 1590s. Sense in weight-lifting is from 1928. Vulgar slang sense of "vulva" is recorded by 1903, perhaps 1864; a much older venereal sense was "sexual intercourse quickly performed" (1580s).

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Definitions of snatch
1
snatch (n.)
a small fragment;
overheard snatches of their conversation
Synonyms: bit
snatch (n.)
obscene terms for female genitals;
Synonyms: cunt / puss / pussy / slit / twat
snatch (n.)
(law) the unlawful act of capturing and carrying away a person against their will and holding them in false imprisonment;
Synonyms: kidnapping
snatch (n.)
a weightlift in which the barbell is lifted overhead in one rapid motion;
snatch (n.)
the act of catching an object with the hands;
Martin's snatch at the bridle failed and the horse raced away
Synonyms: catch / grab / snap
2
snatch (v.)
to grasp hastily or eagerly;
Before I could stop him the dog snatched the ham bone
Synonyms: snatch up / snap
snatch (v.)
to make grasping motions;
the cat snatched at the butterflies
snatch (v.)
take away to an undisclosed location against their will and usually in order to extract a ransom;
Synonyms: kidnap / nobble / abduct
From wordnet.princeton.edu

Dictionary entries near snatch

snare

snarf

snark

snarky

snarl

snatch

snatcher

snazzy

SNCC

SNCF

sneak