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snag (n.)

1570s, "stump of a tree, branch," of Scandinavian origin, compare Old Norse snagi "clothes peg," snaga "a kind of ax," snag-hyrndr "snag-cornered, with sharp points." The ground sense seems to be "a sharp protuberance." The meaning "sharp or jagged projection" is first recorded 1580s; especially "tree or branch in water and partly near the surface, so as to be dangerous to navigation" (1807). The figurative meaning "obstacle, impediment" is from 1829.

snag (v.)

"be caught on an impediment," 1807, from snag (n.). Originally in American English, often in reference to steamboats caught on branches and stumps lodged in riverbeds. Of fabric, from 1967. The transitive meaning "to catch, steal, pick up" is U.S. colloquial, attested from 1895. Related: Snagged; snagging.

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Definitions of snag from WordNet
1
snag (n.)
a sharp protuberance;
snag (n.)
a dead tree that is still standing, usually in an undisturbed forest;
a snag can provide food and a habitat for insects and birds
snag (n.)
an opening made forcibly as by pulling apart;
she had snags in her stockings
Synonyms: rip / rent / split / tear
snag (n.)
an unforeseen obstacle;
Synonyms: hang-up / hitch / rub
2
snag (v.)
catch on a snag;
I snagged my stocking
snag (v.)
get by acting quickly and smartly;
snag a bargain
snag (v.)
hew jaggedly;
From wordnet.princeton.edu