Etymology
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sling (n.1)

c. 1300, "implement for throwing stones," from an unidentified continental Germanic source (such as Middle Low German slinge "a sling"); see sling (v.). The notion probably is of a sling being twisted and twirled before it is thrown. Sense of "loop for lifting or carrying heavy objects" first recorded early 14c. Meaning "piece of cloth tied around the neck to support an injured arm" is first attested 1720.

sling (v.)

c. 1200, "to knock down" using a sling, later "to throw" (mid-13c.), especially with a sling, from Old Norse slyngva, from Proto-Germanic *slingwanan (source also of Old High German slingan, German schlingen "to swing to and fro, wind, twist;" Old English slingan "to creep, twist;" Old Frisian slinge, Middle Dutch slinge, Old High German slinga, German Schlinge "sling;" Middle Swedish slonga "noose, knot, snare"), from PIE *slengwh "to slide, make slide; sling, throw." Meaning "to hang from one point to another" (as a hammock) is from 1690s. Related: Slung; slinging.

sling (n.2)

sweetened, flavored liquor drink, 1807, American English, of unknown origin; perhaps literally "to throw back" a drink (see sling (v.)), or from German schlingen "to swallow."

sling (n.3)

"act of throwing," 1520s, from sling (v.).

updated on October 11, 2013

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Definitions of sling from WordNet
1
sling (n.)
a highball with liquor and water with sugar and lemon or lime juice;
sling (n.)
a plaything consisting of a Y-shaped stick with elastic between the arms; used to propel small stones;
Synonyms: slingshot / catapult
sling (n.)
a shoe that has a strap that wraps around the heel;
Synonyms: slingback
sling (n.)
a simple weapon consisting of a looped strap in which a projectile is whirled and then released;
sling (n.)
bandage to support an injured forearm; consisting of a wide triangular piece of cloth hanging from around the neck;
Synonyms: scarf bandage / triangular bandage
2
sling (v.)
hurl as if with a sling;
Synonyms: catapult
sling (v.)
hang loosely or freely; let swing;
sling (v.)
move with a sling;
sling the cargo onto the ship
sling (v.)
hold or carry in a sling;
he cannot button his shirt with his slinged arm
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.