Etymology
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skim (v.)

early 15c. (skimmer, the utensil, is attested from late 14c.), "to clear (a liquid) from matter floating on the surface, lift the scum from," from Old French escumer "remove scum," from escume (Modern French écume) "scum," from a Germanic source (compare Old High German scum "scum," German Schaum; see scum). Meaning "to throw (a stone) so as to skip across the surface of (water) is from 1610s. Meaning "to move lightly and rapidly over the surface of" is from 1650s, from the motion involved in skimming liquid; that of "to glance over carelessly" (in reference to printed matter) recorded by 1799. Related: Skimmed; skimming.

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Definitions of skim
1
skim (v.)
travel on the surface of water;
Synonyms: plane
skim (v.)
move or pass swiftly and lightly over the surface of;
Synonyms: skim over
skim (v.)
examine hastily;
Synonyms: scan / rake / glance over / run down
skim (v.)
cause to skip over a surface;
Synonyms: skip / skitter
skim (v.)
coat (a liquid) with a layer;
skim (v.)
remove from the surface;
skim cream from the surface of milk
Synonyms: skim off / cream off / cream
skim (v.)
read superficially;
Synonyms: skim over
2
skim (n.)
a thin layer covering the surface of a liquid;
there was a thin skim of oil on the water
skim (n.)
reading or glancing through quickly;
Synonyms: skimming
3
skim (adj.)
used of milk and milk products from which the cream has been removed;
yogurt made with skim milk
she can drink skimmed milk but should avoid butter
Synonyms: skimmed
From wordnet.princeton.edu