Etymology
Advertisement

ski (n.)

1883 (there is an isolated instance from 1755; in early use often spelled skee), from Norwegian ski, related to Old Norse skið "long snowshoe," literally "stick of wood, firewood," cognate with Old English scid "stick of wood," obsolete English shide "piece of wood split off from timber;" Old High German skit, German Scheit "log," from Proto-Germanic *skid- "to divide, split," from PIE root *skei- "to cut, split." Ski-jumper is from 1894; ski bum first attested 1960; ski-mask is from 1963; noted as part of criminal disguises from 1968.

ski (v.)

1885, from ski (n.). Related: Skied; skiing.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of ski
1
ski (v.)
move along on skis;
We love to ski the Rockies
My children don't ski
2
ski (n.)
narrow wood or metal or plastic runners used in pairs for gliding over snow;
From wordnet.princeton.edu