Etymology
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Words related to sing

chant (v.)

late 14c., "to sing," from Old French chanter "to sing, celebrate" (12c.), from Latin cantare "to sing," originally frequentative of canere "sing" (which it replaced), from PIE root *kan- "to sing."

The frequentative quality of the word was no longer felt in Latin, and by the time French emerged the word had entirely displaced canere. Meaning "to sing as in the church service, in a style between song and recitation" is by 1580s. Related: Chanted; chanting.

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ring (v.1)

[sound a bell; emit a resonant sound] Old English hringan "cause (a bell) to sound;" also "announce or celebrate by the ringing of bells," from Proto-Germanic *khrengan (source also of Old Norse hringja, Swedish ringa, Middle Dutch ringen), probably of imitative origin. Related: Rang; rung.

Originally a weak verb, the strong inflection began in early Middle English by influence of sing, etc. The intransitive sense of "give a certain resonant sound when struck" is by c. 1200. Of places, "resound, re-echo," c. 1300. Of the ears or head, "have a continued buzz or hum in reaction to exposure to noise," by late 14c. In reference to a telephone, intransitive, by 1924; as "to call (someone) on a telephone by 1880, with up (adv.). The verb was much used in phrases of 20c. telephoning, such as ring off "hang up," ring back "return a call," ring in "report by telephone."

To ring down (or up) a theatrical curtain, "direct it to be let down" (or up) is by 1772, from the custom of signaling for it by ringing a bell; hence, in a general sense "bring to a conclusion." To ring up a purchase on a cash register is by 1937, from the bell that sounds in the machine. The specialized sense, especially in reference to coins, "give a resonant sound when struck as an indication of genuineness or purity," is by c. 1600, with transferred use (as in ring hollow) by 1610s. For ring a bell "awaken a memory," see bell (n.).

sang 
past tense of sing.
sing-along 
1959, noun and adjective, from verbal phrase; see sing (v.) + along (adv.). Originally associated with U.S. music producer Mitch Miller (1911-2010).
singer (n.)
early 14c. (mid-13c. as a surname), agent noun from sing (v.). Old English had songer "psalm-writer," sangere "singer, poet" (also see songster).
sing-song (adj.)
also singsong, musically repetitive and unvarying, 1734, from earlier use as a noun meaning "a jingling ballad" (c. 1600), from sing (v.) + song (n.).
singspiel (n.)
1876, from German Singspiel, literally "a singing play," from singen "to sing" (see sing (v.)) + Spiel "a play" (see spiel). Kind of performance popular in Germany late 18c.
song (n.)

Old English sang "voice, song, art of singing; metrical composition adapted for singing, psalm, poem," from Proto-Germanic *songwho- (source also of Old Norse söngr, Norwegian song, Swedish sång, Old Saxon, Danish, Old Frisian, Old High German, German sang, Middle Dutch sanc, Dutch zang, Gothic saggws), from PIE *songwh-o- "singing, song," from *sengwh- "to sing, make an incantation" (see sing (v.)).

Phrase for a song "for a trifle, for little or nothing" is from "All's Well" III.ii.9 (the identical image, por du son, is in Old French. With a song in (one's) heart "feeling joy" is first attested 1930 in Lorenz Hart's lyric. Song and dance as a form of vaudeville act is attested from 1872; figurative sense of "rigmarole" is from 1895.

sung 
a past tense and past participle of sing (v.).
unsung (adj.)
early 15c., "not uttered in a song," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of sing (v.). Similar formation in German ungesungen. Meaning "not celebrated" is recorded from 1660s.