Etymology
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simmer (v.)

1650s, alteration of simperen "to simmer" (late 15c.), possibly imitative; not thought to be connected to simper (v.). OED says the change is "probably due to a feeling of phonetic appropriateness." Figurative sense, of feelings, "to be agitated" is from 1764. Opposite sense, in simmer down, first recorded 1871, probably from the notion of moving from a full boil to a mere simmer.

I must and will keep shady and quiet till Bret Harte simmers down a little. ["Mark Twain," letter, 1871]

Related: Simmered; simmering. The noun meaning "a condition of simmering" is from 1809.

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Definitions of simmer
1
simmer (v.)
boil slowly at low temperature;
simmer the sauce
simmering water
2
simmer (n.)
temperature just below the boiling point;
the stew remained at a simmer for hours
From wordnet.princeton.edu