Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to similar

*sem- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "one; as one, together with."

It forms all or part of: anomalous; anomaly; assemble; assimilate; ensemble; facsimile; fulsome; hamadryad; haplo-; haploid; hendeca-; hendiadys; henotheism; hetero-; heterodox; heterosexual; homeo-; homeopathy; homeostasis; homily; homo- (1) "same, the same, equal, like;" homogenous; homoiousian; homologous; homonym; homophone; homosexual; hyphen; resemble; same; samizdat; samovar; samsara; sangha; Sanskrit; seem; seemly; semper-; sempiternal; similar; simple; simplex; simplicity; simulacrum; simulate; simulation; simultaneous; single; singlet; singular; some; -some (1); -some (2); verisimilitude.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sam "together," samah "even, level, similar, identical;" Avestan hama "similar, the same;" Greek hama "together with, at the same time," homos "one and the same," homios "like, resembling," homalos "even;" Latin similis "like;" Old Irish samail "likeness;" Old Church Slavonic samu "himself."

Advertisement
assemble (v.)
early 14c., transitive ("collect into one place") and intransitive ("meet or come together"), from Old French assembler "come together, join, unite; gather" (11c.), from Latin assimulare "to make like, liken, compare; copy, imitate; feign, pretend," later "to gather together," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + simulare "to make like," from stem of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). In Middle English and in Old French it also was a euphemism for "to couple sexually." Meaning "to put parts together" in manufacturing is from 1852. Related: Assembled; assembling. Assemble together is redundant.
assimilate (v.)
early 15c., in physiology, "absorb into and make part of the body," from Latin assimilatus, past participle of assimilare, assimulare "to make like, copy, imitate, assume the form of; feign, pretend," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + simulare "make similar," from similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar).

Meaning "make alike, cause to resemble," and intransitive sense "become incorporated into" are from 1620s. In linguistics, "bring into accordance or agreement in speech," from 1854. Related: Assimilated; assimilating.
dissemble (v.)

early 15c., dissemblen, "assume a false seeming; conceal real facts, motives, intentions, etc.; mask the truth about oneself," from Old French dessembler, from Latin dissimulare "make unlike, conceal, disguise," from dis- "completely" (see dis-) + simulare "to make like, imitate, copy, represent," from stem of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). Related: Dissembled; dissembling.

Form altered apparently by influence of resemble, Old French resembler. Earlier was Middle English dissimule, from Old French dissimuler. Transitive meaning "make unlike, disguise" is from c. 1500; that of "give a false impression of" is from 1510s.

To dissemble is to pretend that a thing which is is not: as, to dissemble one's real sentiments. To simulate is to pretend that a thing which is not is: as, to simulate friendship. To dissimulate is to hide the reality or truth of something under a diverse contrary appearance: as, to dissimulate one's poverty by ostentation. To disguise is to put under a false guise, to keep a thing from being recognized by giving it a false appearance: as I cannot disguise from myself the fact. [Century Dictionary]
dissimilar (adj.)

"unlike in appearance, properties, or nature," 1620s, from dis- + similar; perhaps on analogy of French dissimilaire. Related: Dissimilarity.

dissimulate (v.)

early 15c., dissimulaten, "conceal under false appearances, cause to appear different from the reality," from Latin dissimulatus, past participle of dissimulare "to disguise, hide, conceal, keep secret," from dis- (see dis-) + simulare "to make like, imitate, copy, represent," from stem of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). Intransitive sense of "practice pretense, feign" is from 1796. Related: Dissimulated; dissimulating. Earlier was dissimule (late 14c.), transitive and intransitive, from Old French dissimuler.

ensemble (n.)
1703, "union of parts, parts of a thing taken together," from French ensemblée "all the parts of a thing considered together," from Late Latin insimul "at the same time," from in- intensive prefix + simul "at the same time," related to similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). Musical sense of "union of all parts in a performance" in English first attested 1844. Of women's dress and accessories, from 1927. Earlier in English as an adverb (mid-15c.), "together, at the same time."
facsimile (n.)
"exact copy," 1690s, two words, from Latin fac simile "make similar," from fac imperative of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put") + simile, neuter of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). One-word form predominated in 20c. As an adjective from 1877
resemble (v.)

"be like, have likeness or similarity to," mid-14c., from Old French resembler "be like" (12c., Modern French ressemble), from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix, + sembler "to appear, to seem, be like," from Latin simulare "to make like, imitate, copy, represent," from stem of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar).

Also formerly "to compare or liken (one to another); make an image of" (late 14c.). Related: Resembled; resembling.

semblance (n.)
c. 1300, "fact of appearing to view," from Old French semblance, from semblant "likeness, appearance," present participle of sembler "to seem, appear," from Latin simulare "to resemble, imitate," from similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). Meaning "person's appearance or demeanor" is attested from c. 1400; that of "false, assumed or deceiving appearance" is from 1590s. Meaning "person or thing that resembles another" is attested from 1510s.