Etymology
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signal (n.)

late 14c., "visible sign, indication," from Old French signal, seignal "seal, imprint, sign, mark," from Medieval Latin signale "a signal," from Late Latin signalis (adj.) "used as a signal, pertaining to a sign," from Latin signum "identifying mark, sign" (see sign (n.)). Restricted sense "agreed-upon sign (to commence or desist, etc.) is from 1590s. Meaning "modulation of an electric current" is from 1855.

signal (adj.)

"remarkable, striking, notable" ("serving as a sign"), 1640s, from French signalé, past participle of signaler "to distinguish, signal" (see signal (n.)).

signal (v.)

1805, "to make signals to," from signal (n.). Related: Signaled; signaling. Earlier verb was signalize (1650s).

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Definitions of signal
1
signal (n.)
any incitement to action;
he awaited the signal to start
the victory was a signal for wild celebration
signal (n.)
an electric quantity (voltage or current or field strength) whose modulation represents coded information about the source from which it comes;
signal (n.)
any nonverbal action or gesture that encodes a message;
signals from the boat suddenly stopped
Synonyms: signaling / sign
2
signal (v.)
communicate silently and non-verbally by signals or signs;
The diner signaled the waiters to bring the menu
Synonyms: sign / signalize / signalise
signal (v.)
be a signal for or a symptom of;
The economic indicators signal that the euro is undervalued
Synonyms: bespeak / betoken / indicate / point
3
signal (adj.)
notably out of the ordinary;
the year saw one signal triumph for the Labour party
From wordnet.princeton.edu