Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to siccative

desiccant (n.)

"a substance that dries the surface to which it is applied," 1670s, from Latin desiccantem (nominative desiccans), present-participle of desiccare "to make very dry," from de- "thoroughly" (see de-) + siccare "to dry" (see siccative).

Advertisement
desiccate (v.)

1570s, transitive, "to dry, deprive of moisture," from Latin desiccatus, past participle of desiccare "to make very dry," from de- "thoroughly" (see de-) + siccare "to dry" (see siccative). Intransitive sense of "become dry" is from 1670s. The Middle English translation of Chauliac (early 15c.) has a past-participle adjective desiccate "dried up." Related: Desiccated; desiccating.

desiccation (n.)

early 15c., desiccacioun, "a drying out," from Late Latin desiccationem (nominative desiccatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin desiccare "to make very dry," from de- "thoroughly" (see de-) + siccare "to dry" (see siccative). From 1540s as "act of making dry; state of being dry."

exsiccation (n.)

"act or operation of drying; evaporation of moisture," 1590s, from Late Latin exsiccationem "a drying up," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin exsiccare "dry up, make quite dry," from ex "out" (see ex-) + siccare "make dry" (see siccative).

sack (n.4)

"sherry," 1530s, an alteration of French (vin) sec "dry (wine)," from Latin siccus "dry" (see siccative). Originally of strong, light-colored wine from Spain and the Canaries. OED notes that the vowel is "not a normal development from the original 'seck.' "

sec (adj.)

of wine, "dry," 1863, an English use of French sec (10c.), from Latin siccus "dry" (also source of Italian secco); see siccative.