Etymology
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shunt (v.)

mid-13c., shunten, "to shy, start aside or back, move suddenly," perhaps from shunen, shonen "to shun" (see shun), and altered by influence of shot or shut. The transitive meaning "to turn aside" is from late 14c.; that of "move out of the way" is from 1706. Adopted by railways by 1842, "move cars or a train from a main line to a sidetrack." Related: Shunted; shunting.

shunt (n.)

"a turning aside," 1838, in railway use, from shunt (v.). It was used by technicians in the sense of "circuit introduced to diminish the current through the main circuit" by 1863. Medical use, "natural or artificial route from a vein to an artery," is by 1923. In Middle English it meant "a sudden jerk or swerve" (late 14c.).

updated on September 22, 2022

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