Etymology
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shoulder (n.)

Old English sculdor "shoulder," from West Germanic *skuldro (source also of Middle Dutch scouder, Dutch schouder, Old Frisian skoldere, Middle Low German scholder, Old High German scultra, German Schulter), of unknown origin, perhaps related to shield (n.). Meaning "edge of the road" is attested from 1933. Cold shoulder (Nehemiah ix.29) translates Latin humerum recedentum dare in Vulgate (but see cold shoulder). Shoulder-length, of hair, is from 1951.

shoulder (v.)

c. 1300, "to push with the shoulder," from shoulder (n.). Meaning "take a burden" first recorded 1580s. The military sense is from 1590s. Related: Shouldered; shouldering.

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Definitions of shoulder
1
shoulder (n.)
the part of the body between the neck and the upper arm;
shoulder (n.)
a cut of meat including the upper joint of the foreleg;
shoulder (n.)
a ball-and-socket joint between the head of the humerus and a cavity of the scapula;
Synonyms: shoulder joint / articulatio humeri
shoulder (n.)
the part of a garment that covers or fits over the shoulder;
an ornamental gold braid on the shoulder of his uniform
shoulder (n.)
a narrow edge of land (usually unpaved) along the side of a road;
the car pulled off onto the shoulder
Synonyms: berm
2
shoulder (v.)
lift onto one's shoulders;
shoulder (v.)
push with the shoulders;
He shouldered his way into the crowd
shoulder (v.)
carry a burden, either real or metaphoric;
shoulder the burden
From wordnet.princeton.edu

Dictionary entries near shoulder

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