Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to shop

shopping (n.)
1764, "act or practice of visiting shops," verbal noun from shop (v.). Meaning "goods that have been purchased" is from 1934. Shopping bag attested from 1886; shopping list from 1913.
Advertisement
shopaholic (n.)
1984, from shop (v.) + -aholic.
shopper (n.)
agent noun from shop (v.).
barber-shop (n.)
1570s, from barber + shop (n.). Earlier in same sense was barbery (c. 1500). Barber-shop in reference to close harmony male vocal quartets, it is attested from 1910; the custom of barber's keeping a musical instrument in their shops so waiting customers could entertain themselves is an old one, but the musical product formerly had a low reputation and barber's music (c. 1660) was "wretched, poorly performed music."
machine-shop (n.)

"workshop in which machines or parts of machines are made and repaired," 1827, from machine (n.) + shop (n.).

pawnshop (n.)

also pawn-shop, "pawnbroker's establishment," by 1763, from pawn (n.1) + shop (n.).

shopkeeper (n.)
1520s, from shop (n.) + keeper.
shoplifter (n.)
1670s, from shop (n.) + agent noun of lift (v.). Also in same sense shop-lift (1670s); shop-thief.
shoppe (n.)

one of several Middle English variations of shop (n.). It appears in Chaucer. Noted by 1918 as an antiquarian affectation in U.S. commercial establishments.

YE EAT SHOPPE
I admit that the name is against it. As a matter of fact, 732 Eighth Avenue is nothing more nor less than a good old-fashioned midnight lunch-room camouflaged by a flossy title. [Helen Worden Erskine, "The Real New York," 1933]
shop-window (n.)
mid-15c., from shop (n.) + window (n.).