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shank (n.)

Old English sceanca "leg, shank, shinbone," specifically, the part of the leg from the knee to the ankle, from Proto-Germanic *skunkia- (source also of Middle Low German schenke, German schenkel "shank, leg"), perhaps literally "that which bends," from PIE root *skeng- "crooked" (source also of Old Norse skakkr "wry, distorted," Greek skazein "to limp"). Shank's mare "one's own legs as a means of transportation" is attested from 1774 (shanks-naig).

shank (v.)

1927, in golf, "to strike (the ball) with the heel of the club," from shank (n.). Related: Shanked; shanking. Earlier as "to take to one's legs" (1774, Scottish); "to send off without ceremony" (1816).

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Definitions of shank
1
shank (n.)
a cut of meat (beef or veal or mutton or lamb) from the upper part of the leg;
shank (n.)
the part of the human leg between the knee and the ankle;
shank (n.)
cylinder forming a long narrow part of something;
Synonyms: stem
shank (n.)
cylinder forming the part of a bolt between the thread and the head;
shank (n.)
cylinder forming the part of a bit by which it is held in the drill;
shank (n.)
the narrow part of the shoe connecting the heel and the wide part of the sole;
Synonyms: waist
shank (n.)
lower part of the leg extending from the hock to the fetlock in hoofed mammals;
Synonyms: cannon
shank (n.)
a poor golf stroke in which the heel of the club hits the ball;
2
shank (v.)
hit (a golf ball) with the heel of a club, causing the ball to veer in the wrong direction;
From wordnet.princeton.edu