Etymology
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shackle (n.)

kind of fetter, especially for the wrist or ankle of a prisoner, Middle English shakel, from Old English sceacel, sceacul "shackle, fetter," probably also in a general sense "a link or ring of a chain," from Proto-Germanic *skakula- (source also of Middle Dutch, Dutch schakel "link of a chain, ring of a net," Old Norse skökull "pole of a carriage"), of uncertain origin. According to OED, the common notion of "something to fasten or attach" makes a connection with shake unlikely. Figurative sense of "anything which hinders or restrains" is by early 13c. Related: Shackledom "marriage" (1771); shacklebone "the wrist" (1570s) is Scottish or northern dialect.

shackle (v.)

mid-15c., shakelen, "chain, put in shackles, bind in shackles," from shackle (n.). Figurative use is by 1560s. Related: Shackled; shackling.

updated on July 21, 2022

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Definitions of shackle from WordNet
1
shackle (v.)
bind the arms of;
Synonyms: pinion
shackle (v.)
restrain with fetters;
Synonyms: fetter
2
shackle (n.)
a restraint that confines or restricts freedom (especially something used to tie down or restrain a prisoner);
Synonyms: bond / hamper / trammel
shackle (n.)
a U-shaped bar; the open end can be passed through chain links and closed with a bar;
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.