Etymology
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servile (adj.)

late 14c., "laborious, subordinate, appropriate to a servant or to the class of slaves," originally in reference to work that it is forbidden to do on the Sabbath, from Latin servilis "of a slave" (as in Servile Wars, name given to the slave revolts in the late Roman Republic), also "slavish, servile," from servus "slave" (see serve (v.)). Related: Servilely.

By mid-15c. as "of the rank of a servant; of or pertaining to servants;" the sense of "cringing, fawning, mean-spirited, lacking independence" is recorded from c. 1600 The earliest sense in English was Church-legal, servile work being forbidden on the Sabbath. The phrase translates Latin opus servilis, itself a literal translation of the Hebrew words.

updated on June 04, 2022

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Definitions of servile from WordNet

servile (adj.)
relating to or involving slaves or appropriate for slaves or servants;
servile work
the servile wars of Sicily
Brown's attempt at servile insurrection
servile (adj.)
submissive or fawning in attitude or behavior;
servile tasks such as floor scrubbing and barn work
spoke in a servile tone
the incurably servile housekeeper
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.