Etymology
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sequester (v.)

late 14c., sequestren, transitive, "remove (something), set aside; quarantine, isolate (someone); excommunicate;" also intransitive, "separate oneself from," from Old French sequestrer (14c.) and directly from Late Latin sequestrare "to place in safekeeping," from Latin sequester "trustee, mediator," noun use of an adjective meaning "intermediate," which probably is related to sequi "to follow" (from PIE root *sekw- (1) "to follow").

The legal meaning "seize by authority, confiscate" is attested from 1510s. The alternative verb sequestrate is early 15c. (Chauliac), from the Latin past participle sequestratus. Related: Sequestered; sequestering.

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Definitions of sequester

sequester (v.)
requisition forcibly, as of enemy property;
the estate was sequestered
sequester (v.)
take temporary possession of as a security, by legal authority;
Synonyms: impound / attach / confiscate / seize
sequester (v.)
undergo sequestration by forming a stable compound with an ion;
The cations were sequestered
sequester (v.)
keep away from others;
He sequestered himself in his study to write a book
Synonyms: seclude / sequestrate / withdraw
sequester (v.)
set apart from others;
The dentist sequesters the tooth he is working on
Synonyms: sequestrate / keep apart / set apart / isolate
From wordnet.princeton.edu