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sequence (n.)

late 14c., "hymn sung after the Hallelujah and before the Gospel," from Old French sequence "answering verses" (13c.), from Medieval Latin sequentia "a following, a succession," from Latin sequentem (nominative sequens), present participle of sequi "to follow" (from PIE root *sekw- (1) "to follow"). In Church use, a partial loan-translation of Greek akolouthia, from akolouthos "following." General sense of "succession," also "a sequence at cards," appeared 1570s.

sequence (v.)

"arrange in a sequence," 1954, from sequence (n.). Related: Sequenced; sequencing.

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Definitions of sequence from WordNet
1
sequence (n.)
serial arrangement in which things follow in logical order or a recurrent pattern;
he invented a technique to determine the sequence of base pairs in DNA
the sequence of names was alphabetical
sequence (n.)
a following of one thing after another in time;
the doctor saw a sequence of patients
Synonyms: chronological sequence / succession / successiveness / chronological succession
sequence (n.)
film consisting of a succession of related shots that develop a given subject in a movie;
Synonyms: episode
sequence (n.)
the action of following in order;
he played the trumps in sequence
Synonyms: succession
sequence (n.)
several repetitions of a melodic phrase in different keys;
2
sequence (v.)
arrange in a sequence;
sequence (v.)
determine the order of constituents in;
They sequenced the human genome
From wordnet.princeton.edu