Etymology
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Words related to septic

sepsis (n.)

"putrefaction, decomposition, rot," 1876, from Modern Latin sepsis, from Greek sēpsis "putrefaction," from sēpein "to rot," a word of unknown origin, possibly Pre-Greek.

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antiseptic (adj.)
also anti-septic, "inimical to micro-organisms which cause disease, putrefaction, etc.," 1750, from anti- "against" + septic "pertaining to putrefaction." Figurative use by 1820. As a noun meaning "an antiseptic substance" by 1803.
aseptic (adj.)
"free from the micro-organisms that cause putrefaction or fermentation," 1855, from a- (3) "not" + septic. As a noun, "aseptic substance," from 1884.
septicemia (n.)

in medicine, "sepsis poisoning, putrefaction," 1857, Modern Latin septicæmia, from French septicoemi, coined irregularly by French physician Pierre-Adolphe Piorry (1794-1879) in 1837 from Greek septikos (see septic) + haima "blood" (see -emia). Related: Septicemic.

Dr. Piorry, in a second communication, insists upon the fact, that in a great number of cases the decaying contents of the uterus, and the putrid infection of the blood from this source, constitute the so-called puerperal fever, and he thinks that the discussion in the Academy is only a fight about words, as the different speakers agree, without knowing it themselves, upon the nature of the disease. He proposes the name of septicemia, as best designating the sources of the disease, viz., from putrid infection from the uterus, and by the respiration of an atmosphere pregnant with septic particles. ... The admission of this septicemia explains the putrid accidents, as observed in men, the foetus, and wounded persons during a puerperal epidemic. [E. Noeggerath and A. Jacobi, "Contributions to Midwifery," New York, 1859]