Etymology
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seem (v.)

late 12c., "to be fitting, be appropriate, be suitable;" c. 1200, "to appear to be, have or present the appearance of being;" from Old Norse soema "to honor; to put up with; to conform to (the world, etc.)," verb derived from adjective soemr "fitting," from Proto-Germanic *somiz (source also of Old English som "agreement, reconciliation," seman "to conciliate," source of Middle English semen "to settle a dispute," literally "to make one;" Old Danish söme "to be proper or seemly"), from PIE *somi-, suffixed form of root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with."

The sense of "be fitting, be appropriate" in English is the etymological one, but it is obsolete except in derived seemly, unseemly. Related: Seemed; seeming.

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Definitions of seem

seem (v.)
give a certain impression or have a certain outward aspect;
She seems to be sleeping
Synonyms: look / appear
seem (v.)
seem to be true, probable, or apparent;
It seems that he is very gifted
Synonyms: appear
seem (v.)
appear to exist;
There seems no reason to go ahead with the project now
seem (v.)
appear to one's own mind or opinion;
I can't seem to learn these Chinese characters
I seem to be misunderstood by everyone
From wordnet.princeton.edu