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seed (n.)

Old English sed, sæd "that which may be sown; an individual grain of seed; offspring, posterity," from Proto-Germanic *sediz "seed" (source also of Old Norse sað, Old Saxon sad, Old Frisian sed, Middle Dutch saet, Old High German sat, German Saat), from PIE *se-ti- "sowing," from root *sē- "to sow." Figurative use in Old English. Meaning "offspring, progeny" rare now except in biblical use. Meaning "semen" is from c. 1300. For sporting sense, see seed (v.).

seed (v.)

late 14c., "to flower, flourish; produce seed;" mid-15c., "to sow with seed," from seed (n.). Meaning "remove the seeds from" is from 1904. Sporting (originally tennis) sense (1898) is from notion of spreading certain players' names so as to ensure they will not meet early in a tournament. The noun in this sense is attested from 1924. Related: Seeded; seeding.

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Definitions of seed from WordNet
1
seed (v.)
go to seed; shed seeds;
The dandelions went to seed
seed (v.)
help (an enterprise) in its early stages of development by providing seed money;
seed (v.)
bear seeds;
seed (v.)
place (seeds) in or on the ground for future growth;
She sowed sunflower seeds
Synonyms: sow
seed (v.)
distribute (players or teams) so that outstanding teams or players will not meet in the early rounds;
seed (v.)
sprinkle with silver iodide particles to disperse and cause rain;
seed clouds
seed (v.)
inoculate with microorganisms;
seed (v.)
remove the seeds from;
seed grapes
2
seed (n.)
a small hard fruit;
seed (n.)
a mature fertilized plant ovule consisting of an embryo and its food source and having a protective coat or testa;
seed (n.)
one of the outstanding players in a tournament;
Synonyms: seeded player
seed (n.)
anything that provides inspiration for later work;
Synonyms: source / germ
seed (n.)
the thick white fluid containing spermatozoa that is ejaculated by the male genital tract;
Synonyms: semen / seminal fluid / ejaculate / cum / come
From wordnet.princeton.edu