Etymology
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Words related to secede

se- 

word-forming element in words of Latin origin, "apart, away," from Latin se-, collateral form of sed- "without, apart, aside," probably originally "by one's self, on one's own," and related to sed, Latin reflexive pronoun (accusative and ablative), from PIE *sed-, extended form of root *s(w)e-, pronoun of the third person and reflexive (source also of German sich; see idiom).

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*ked- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to go, yield."

It forms all or part of: abscess; accede; access; ancestor; antecede; antecedent; cease; cede; cession; concede; decease; exceed; excess; incessant; intercede; necessary; precede; predecessor; proceed; recede; recess; recession; secede; secession; succeed; success.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sedhati "to drive, chase away;" Avestan apa-had- "turn aside, step aside;" Latin cedere "to yield, give place; to give up some right or property," originally "to go from, proceed, leave;" Old Church Slavonic chodu "a walking, going," choditi "to go."
cede (v.)

1630s, "to yield, give way," from French céder or directly from Latin cedere "to yield, give place; to give up some right or property," originally "to go from, proceed, leave," from Proto-Italic *kesd-o- "to go away, avoid," from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield."

Original sense in English is now archaic; transitive sense "yield or formally surrender (something) to another" is from 1754. The sense evolution in Latin is via the notion of "to go away, withdraw, give ground." Related: Ceded; ceding.

Latin cedere, with prefixes attached,  is the source of a great many English words: accede, concede, exceed, precede, proceed, recede, secede, etc.

secessionist (n.)

1860, first in a U.S. context, "one who takes part in or justifies the attempt by the Southern states to withdraw from the union," from secession + -ist. Colloquial short form secesh, noun and adjective, is attested from 1861. The earlier noun had been seceder (1755), but this had religious overtones, especially (with capital s-) in reference to Scottish Church history (see secede). Related: Secessionism.