Etymology
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search (v.)

c. 1300, from Old French cerchier "to search" (12c., Modern French chercher), from Latin circare "go about, wander, traverse," in Late Latin "to wander hither and thither," from circus "circle" (see circus). Phrase search me as a verbal shrug of ignorance first recorded 1901. Search engine attested from 1988. Search and destroy as a modifier is 1966, American English, from the Vietnam War. Search and rescue is from 1944.

search (n.)

c. 1400, "act of searching;" early 15c., "right to investigate illegal activity; examination of records, wills, etc.; a search through an area or a place," from Anglo-French serche, Old French cerche, from cerchier (see search (v.)). Search warrant attested from 1739.

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Definitions of search
1
search (n.)
the activity of looking thoroughly in order to find something or someone;
Synonyms: hunt / hunting
search (n.)
an investigation seeking answers;
the outcome justified the search
a thorough search of the ledgers revealed nothing
search (n.)
an operation that determines whether one or more of a set of items has a specified property;
Synonyms: lookup
search (n.)
the examination of alternative hypotheses;
his search for a move that would avoid checkmate was unsuccessful
search (n.)
boarding and inspecting a ship on the high seas;
right of search
2
search (v.)
try to locate or discover, or try to establish the existence of;
The police are searching for clues
They are searching for the missing man in the entire county
Synonyms: seek / look for
search (v.)
search or seek;
Synonyms: look
search (v.)
inquire into;
He searched for information on his relatives on the web
Synonyms: research / explore
search (v.)
subject to a search;
The police searched the suspect
We searched the whole house for the missing keys
From wordnet.princeton.edu