Etymology
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scruple (n.)

"moral misgiving, pang of conscience," late 14c., from Old French scrupule (14c.), from Latin scrupulus "uneasiness, anxiety, pricking of conscience," literally "small sharp stone," diminutive of scrupus "sharp stone or pebble," used figuratively by Cicero for a cause of uneasiness or anxiety, probably from the notion of having a pebble in one's shoe. The word in the more literal Latin sense of "small unit of weight or measurement" is attested in English from late 14c.

scruple (v.)

"to have or make scruples," 1620s, from scruple (n.). Related: Scrupled; scrupling.

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Definitions of scruple
1
scruple (v.)
hesitate on moral grounds;
The man scrupled to perjure himself
scruple (v.)
raise scruples;
He lied and did not even scruple about it
scruple (v.)
have doubts about;
2
scruple (n.)
a unit of apothecary weight equal to 20 grains;
scruple (n.)
uneasiness about the fitness of an action;
Synonyms: qualm / misgiving
scruple (n.)
an ethical or moral principle that inhibits action;
From wordnet.princeton.edu