Etymology
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scorpion (n.)

type of arachnid inhabiting warm regions, notable for its large "nippers" and the painful sting in its tail, c. 1200,scorpioun, perhaps late Old English, from Old French scorpion (12c.), from Latin scorpionem (nominative scorpio), extended form of scorpius, from Greek skorpios "a scorpion" (from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut"). The Spanish alacran "scorpion" is from Arabic al-'aqrab. Symbolic in Middle English of a treacherous person. As the zodiac sign by late 14c. Related: Scorpioid.

Centipeds and tarantulas are often confounded in the popular mind with scorpions, as are also various small lizards, in the latter case probably from the habit some of them have of carrying their tails up. Thus, in the United States, some harmless lizards or skinks, as of the genera Sceloporus and Eumeces, are commonly called scorpions. [Century Dictionary, 1895]

updated on February 09, 2022

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Definitions of scorpion from WordNet
1
scorpion (n.)
arachnid of warm dry regions having a long segmented tail ending in a venomous stinger;
2
Scorpion (n.)
(astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in Scorpio;
Synonyms: Scorpio
Scorpion (n.)
the eighth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about October 23 to November 21;
Synonyms: Scorpio / Scorpio the Scorpion
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.