Etymology
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scoop (v.)

mid-14c., "to bail out," from scoop (n.) and from Low German scheppen "to draw water," from Proto-Germanic *skuppon (source also of Old Saxon skeppian, Dutch scheppen, Old High German scaphan, German schöpfen "to scoop, ladle out"), from PIE root *skeubh- (source also of Old English sceofl "shovel," Old Saxon skufla; see shove (v.)). In the journalistic sense from 1884. Related: Scooped; scooping.

scoop (n.)

early 14c., "utensil for bailing out," from Middle Dutch schope "bucket for bailing water," from West Germanic *skopo (source also of Middle Low German schope "ladle"), from Proto-Germanic *skop-, from PIE *(s)kep- "to cut, to scrape, to hack" (see scabies). Also from Middle Dutch schoepe "a scoop, shovel" (Dutch schop "a spade," related to German Schüppe "a shovel," also "a spade at cards").

Meaning "action of scooping" is from 1742; that of "amount in a scoop" is from 1832. Sense of "a big haul, as if in a scoop net" is from 1893. The journalistic sense of "news published before a rival" is first recorded 1874, American English, from earlier commercial slang verbal sense of "appropriate so as to exclude competitors" (c. 1850).

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Definitions of scoop
1
scoop (n.)
the quantity a scoop will hold;
Synonyms: scoopful
scoop (n.)
a hollow concave shape made by removing something;
Synonyms: pocket
scoop (n.)
a news report that is reported first by one news organization;
he got a scoop on the bribery of city officials
Synonyms: exclusive
scoop (n.)
street names for gamma hydroxybutyrate;
Synonyms: soap / max / liquid ecstasy / grievous bodily harm / goop / Georgia home boy / easy lay
scoop (n.)
the shovel or bucket of a dredge or backhoe;
Synonyms: scoop shovel
scoop (n.)
a large ladle;
he used a scoop to serve the ice cream
2
scoop (v.)
take out or up with or as if with a scoop;
scoop the sugar out of the container
Synonyms: scoop out / lift out / scoop up / take up
scoop (v.)
get the better of;
Synonyms: outdo / outflank / trump / best
From wordnet.princeton.edu