Etymology
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scat (interj.)

"go away!" 1838, from expression quicker than s'cat "in a great hurry," in which the word probably represents a hiss followed by the word cat.

scat (n.1)

"nonsense patter sung to jazz," 1926, probably of imitative origin, from one of the syllables used. As a verb, 1935, from the noun. Related: Scatting.

scat (n.2)

"filth, dung," 1950, from Greek stem skat- "dung" (see scatology).

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Definitions of scat
1
scat (v.)
flee; take to one's heels; cut and run;
Synonyms: run / scarper / turn tail / lam / run away / hightail it / bunk / head for the hills / take to the woods / escape / fly the coop / break away
2
scat (n.)
singing jazz; the singer substitutes nonsense syllables for the words of the song and tries to sound like a musical instrument;
Synonyms: scat singing
From wordnet.princeton.edu