Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to saw

sawtooth (n.)
c. 1600, from saw (n.1) + tooth.
Advertisement
see-saw (n.)

also seesaw, 1630s, in see-saw-sacke a downe (like a Sawyer), words in a rhythmic jingle used by children and repetitive motion workers, probably imitative of the rhythmic back-and-forth motion of sawyers working a two-man saw over wood or stone (see saw (n.1). Ha ha.).

In reference to a game of going up and down on a balanced plank, it is recorded from 1704; figurative sense is from 1714. Applied from 1824 to the plank arranged for the game. Also compare teeter-totter under teeter (v.). 

whip-saw (n.)
also whipsaw, 1530s, from whip + saw (n.). As a verb from 1842. Related: Whip-sawed; whip-sawing.

Page 3