Etymology
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Words related to satisfy

*sa- 
*sā-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to satisfy."

It forms all or part of: assets; hadron; sad; sate; satiate; satiety; satisfy; satire; saturate; saturation.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit a-sinvan "insatiable;" Greek hadros "thick, bulky;" Latin satis "enough, sufficient;" Old Church Slavonic sytu, Lithuanian sotus "satiated;" Old Irish saith "satiety," sathach "sated;" Old English sæd "sated, full, having had one's fill, weary of."
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*dhe- 

*dhē-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to set, put."

It forms all or part of: abdomen; abscond; affair; affect (v.1) "make a mental impression on;" affect (v.2) "make a pretense of;" affection; amplify; anathema; antithesis; apothecary; artifact; artifice; beatific; benefice; beneficence; beneficial; benefit; bibliothec; bodega; boutique; certify; chafe; chauffeur; comfit; condiment; confection; confetti; counterfeit; deed; deem; deface; defeasance; defeat; defect; deficient; difficulty; dignify; discomfit; do (v.); doom; -dom; duma; edifice; edify; efface; effect; efficacious; efficient; epithet; facade; face; facet; facial; -facient; facile; facilitate; facsimile; fact; faction (n.1) "political party;" -faction; factitious; factitive; factor; factory; factotum; faculty; fashion; feasible; feat; feature; feckless; fetish; -fic; fordo; forfeit; -fy; gratify; hacienda; hypothecate; hypothesis; incondite; indeed; infect; justify; malefactor; malfeasance; manufacture; metathesis; misfeasance; modify; mollify; multifarious; notify; nullify; office; officinal; omnifarious; orifice; parenthesis; perfect; petrify; pluperfect; pontifex; prefect; prima facie; proficient; profit; prosthesis; prothesis; purdah; putrefy; qualify; rarefy; recondite; rectify; refectory; sacrifice; salmagundi; samadhi; satisfy; sconce; suffice; sufficient; surface; surfeit; synthesis; tay; ticking (n.); theco-; thematic; theme; thesis; verify.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit dadhati "puts, places;" Avestan dadaiti "he puts;" Old Persian ada "he made;" Hittite dai- "to place;" Greek tithenai "to put, set, place;" Latin facere "to make, do; perform; bring about;" Lithuanian dėti "to put;" Polish dziać się "to be happening;" Russian delat' "to do;" Old High German tuon, German tun, Old English don "to do."

dissatisfy (v.)

"render discontented, fall short of one's wishes or expectations," 1660s; see dis- + satisfy. Related: Dissatisfied; dissatisfying.

satisfaction (n.)

early 14c., satisfaccioun, "performance by a penitent of an act set forth by a priest or other Church authority to atone for sin," from Old French satisfaction (12c.), from Latin satisfactionem (nominative satisfactio) "a satisfying of a creditor," noun of action from past-participle stem of satisfacere "discharge fully, comply with, make amends," literally "to do enough" (see satisfy).

Originally religious and involving such acts as expiatory prayer, self-denial, charity. The sense of "contentment, appeasement" is from late 14c. but was not common before 16c. The sense of "action of gratifying" (an appetite or desire) also is from late 14c.; that of "gratified or contented feeling or state of mind" is from late 15c. (Caxton).

From 1580s as "information that answers a person's demands or removes doubt." Hence the specific sense "opportunity of satisfying one's honor by accepting a duel, etc., with the aggrieved person" (c. 1600).

satisfactory (adj.)

mid-15c., satisfactorie, "expiatory, capable of atoning for sin," from Old French satisfactoire (14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin satisfactorius, from Latin satisfactus, past participle of satisfacere "discharge fully, comply with, make amends," literally "do enough" (see satisfy).

The meaning "adequate, fulfilling the demands or requirements of the case" is from 1630s; that of "that fully gratifies or contents, that justifies a feeling of satisfaction" is from 1660s. Related: Satisfactorily; satisfactoriness. Bentham used satisfactive for "having to do with reparation" (1829).

satisfice (v.)

1560s, transitive, "to satisfy" (implied in satisficed), altered from satisfy by influence of its Latin root satisfacere. A Northern English colloquial word; the modern use in the sense of "do just enough to meet" (requirements, etc.) is by c. 1956 and might be an independent formation. Related: Satisficing.

satisfied (adj.)

1816, of persons, "gratified, contented," past-participle adjective from satisfy. Earlier was self-satisfied (1734).

satisfying (adj.)
c. 1600, present-participle adjective from satisfy. Related: Satisfyingly.