Etymology
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satisfaction (n.)

early 14c., satisfaccioun, "performance by a penitent of an act set forth by a priest or other Church authority to atone for sin," from Old French satisfaction (12c.), from Latin satisfactionem (nominative satisfactio) "a satisfying of a creditor," noun of action from past-participle stem of satisfacere "discharge fully, comply with, make amends," literally "to do enough" (see satisfy).

Originally religious and involving such acts as expiatory prayer, self-denial, charity. The sense of "contentment, appeasement" is from late 14c. but was not common before 16c. The sense of "action of gratifying" (an appetite or desire) also is from late 14c.; that of "gratified or contented feeling or state of mind" is from late 15c. (Caxton).

From 1580s as "information that answers a person's demands or removes doubt." Hence the specific sense "opportunity of satisfying one's honor by accepting a duel, etc., with the aggrieved person" (c. 1600).

updated on December 29, 2021

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Definitions of satisfaction from WordNet

satisfaction (n.)
the contentment one feels when one has fulfilled a desire, need, or expectation;
the chef tasted the sauce with great satisfaction
satisfaction (n.)
state of being gratified or satisfied;
Synonyms: gratification
satisfaction (n.)
compensation for a wrong;
we were unable to get satisfaction from the local store
Synonyms: atonement / expiation
satisfaction (n.)
(law) the payment of a debt or fulfillment of an obligation;
the full and final satisfaction of the claim
satisfaction (n.)
act of fulfilling a desire or need or appetite;
the satisfaction of their demand for better services
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.