Etymology
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Words related to sanguinary

*kreue- 

*kreuə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "raw flesh."

It forms all or part of: 

creatine; creosote; crude; cruel; ecru; pancreas; raw; recrudesce; recrudescence.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit kravis- "raw flesh," krura- "raw, bloody;" Greek kreas "flesh;" Latin crudus "bloody, raw; cruel," cruor "thick blood;" Old Irish cru "gore, blood," Middle Irish cruaid "hardy, harsh, stern;" Old Church Slavonic kry "blood;" Old Prussian krawian, Lithuanian kraūjas "blood;" Old English hreaw "raw," hrot "thick fluid, serum."

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consanguine (adj.)

"descended from a common ancestor," c. 1600, from French consanguin (14c.), from Latin consanguineus "of the same blood," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sanguineus "of blood" (see sanguinary).

consanguineous (adj.)

"of the same blood, related by birth," c. 1600, from Latin consanguineus "of the same blood," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sanguineus "of blood" (see sanguinary).

consanguinity (n.)

"kinship by common descent," c. 1400, from Old French consanguinité and directly from Latin consanguinitatem (nominative consanguinitas), from consanguineus "of the same blood," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sanguineus "of blood" (see sanguinary).

exsanguinate (v.)

"render bloodless," 1827, from Latin exsanguinatus "bloodless," as if from a past participle of *exsanguinare, from ex "out" (see ex-) + sanguinem (nominative sanguis) "blood" (see sanguinary). Related: Exsanguinated; exsanguinating; exsanguination. As an adjective, exsanguine "bloodless" is attested from mid-17c. in literal and figurative use.

sang-froid (n.)

also sangfroid, "presence of mind, coolness, mental composure," 1712, from French sang froid, literally "cool blood," from sang "blood" (from Latin sanguis; see sanguinary) + froid "cold" (from Latin frigidus; see frigid). "In the 17th c. the expression was in France often written erroneously sens froid, as if it contained sens "sense" instead of the homophonous sang "blood'." [OED].

sangria (n.)

cold drink made variously from sweetened and diluted red wine, 1954, from Spanish, literally "a bleeding," from sangre "blood," from Vulgar Latin *sanguem, from Latin sanguis (see sanguinary). The drink so named for its color. Earlier in English as sangre (1736), sangaree.

sanguicolous (adj.)

"living in the blood" (as a parasite does), by 1889, from Latin sanguis "blood" (see sanguinary) + colere "to inhabit" (see colony). Also, with classical stem, sanguinicolous.

sanguine (adj.)

late 14c., "blood-red, of a blood-red color" (late 12c. as a surname), from Old French sanguin (fem. sanguine) and directly from Latin sanguineus "of blood," also "bloody, bloodthirsty," from sanguis (genitive sanguinis) "blood" (see sanguinary).

The meaning "cheerful, hopeful, vivacious, confident" is attested by c. 1500, because these qualities were thought in old medicine to spring from an excess or predominance of blood as one of the four humors. The sense of "of or pertaining to blood" (mid-15c.) is rare.

 Also in Middle English as a noun, a type of red cloth (early 14c.). It sometimes was used in the senses now going with sanguinary.

sanguineous (adj.)

1510s, "of the color of blood, of a deep red color;" 1640s, "of or pertaining to blood," from Latin sanguineus "of blood, bloody," from sanguin-, stem of sanguis (see sanguinary).