Etymology
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sandblind (adj.)

also sand-blind, "half-blind, partially blind, dim-sighted," c. 1400, probably altered (by influence of unrelated sand (n.), perhaps as though "having grit in the eyes"), from Old English *samblind, with blind (adj.) + first element from West Germanic *sami-, from PIE *semi- (see semi-).

Now archaic or obsolete. Compare Old English samlæred "half-taught, badly instructed," samstorfen "half-dead," also later sam-hale "in poor health," literally "half-whole;" sam-sodden "half-cooked." Also compare purblind.

updated on December 08, 2021

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