Etymology
Advertisement

salient (adj.)

1560s, "leaping," a heraldic term, from Latin salientem (nominative saliens), present participle of salire "to leap," from a PIE root of uncertain form (source also of Sanskrit sisarsi, sisrate "to flow, run, hurry;"Greek hallesthai "to leap," Middle Irish saltraim "I trample," Middle Welsh sathar "trampling").

The meaning "pointing outward" (preserved in military usage) is from 1680s; that of "prominent, striking" first recorded 1840, from salient point (1670s), which refers to the heart of an embryo, which seems to leap, and translates Latin punctum saliens, going back to Aristotle's writings. Hence, the "starting point" of anything.

salient (n.)

"a salient angle or part, a projection," especially as part of a military work, 1828, from salient (adj.).

updated on November 21, 2021

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of salient from WordNet
1
salient (adj.)
represented as leaping (rampant but leaning forward);
salient (adj.)
having a quality that thrusts itself into attention;
salient traits
salient (adj.)
(of angles) pointing outward at an angle of less than 180 degrees;
2
salient (n.)
(military) the part of the line of battle that projects closest to the enemy;
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.