Etymology
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safe (adj.)

c. 1300, sauf, "unscathed, unhurt, uninjured; free from danger or molestation, in safety, secure; saved spiritually, redeemed, not damned;" from Old French sauf "protected, watched-over; assured of salvation," from Latin salvus "uninjured, in good health, safe," which is related to salus "good health," saluber "healthful" (all from PIE *solwos from root *sol- "whole, well-kept"). For the phonological development of safe from sauf, OED compares gage from Old North French gauge.

From late 14c. as "rescued, delivered; protected; left alive, unkilled." The meaning "not exposed to danger" (of places, later of valuables) is attested from late 14c.; in reference to actions, etc., the meaning "free from risk," is recorded by 1580s. The sense of "sure, reliable, not a danger" is from c. 1600. The sense of "conservative, cautious" is from 1823. It has been paired alliteratively with sound (adj.) from c. 1300. In Middle English it also meant "in good health," also "delivered from sin or damnation." Related: Safeness.

safe (n.)

"chest for keeping food or valuables" safe from risk of theft or fire, early 15c., save, from French en sauf "in safety," from sauf (see safe (adj.)). Spelling with -f- is by 1680s, from influence of safe (adj.).

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Definitions of safe
1
safe (adj.)
having reached a base without being put out;
the runner was called safe when the baseman dropped the ball
safe (adj.)
free from danger or the risk of harm;
you will be safe here
a safe bet
a safe place
a safe trip
safe (adj.)
(of an undertaking) secure from risk;
safe (adj.)
financially safe;
Synonyms: dependable / good / secure
2
safe (n.)
strongbox where valuables can be safely kept;
safe (n.)
a ventilated or refrigerated cupboard for securing provisions from pests;
safe (n.)
contraceptive device consisting of a sheath of thin rubber or latex that is worn over the penis during intercourse;
Synonyms: condom / rubber / safety / prophylactic
From wordnet.princeton.edu