Etymology
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saddle (n.)

Middle English sadel, from Old English sadol "contrivance secured to the back of a horse, etc., as a seat for a rider," from Proto-Germanic *sathulaz (source also of Old Norse söðull, Old Frisian sadel, Dutch zadel, zaal, German Sattel "saddle"), from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit" + Germanic suffix *-þra, used to form neutral names of tools.

Extended to various things resembling or functioning as a saddle. Figurative phrase in the saddle "in an active position of management" is attested from 1650s. Saddle-horse "horse for riding" is from 1660s. Saddle-stitch (n.) is from bookbinding (1887).

saddle (v.)

Old English sadolian "to put a riding saddle on;" see saddle (n.). The meaning "to load with or as with a burden" is recorded by 1690s. Related: Saddled; saddling.

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Definitions of saddle
1
saddle (n.)
a seat for the rider of a horse or other animal;
saddle (n.)
a pass or ridge that slopes gently between two peaks (is shaped like a saddle);
Synonyms: saddleback
saddle (n.)
cut of meat (especially mutton or lamb) consisting of part of the backbone and both loins;
saddle (n.)
a piece of leather across the instep of a shoe;
saddle (n.)
a seat for the rider of a bicycle;
Synonyms: bicycle seat
saddle (n.)
posterior part of the back of a domestic fowl;
2
saddle (v.)
put a saddle on;
saddle the horses
saddle (v.)
load or burden; encumber;
he saddled me with that heavy responsibility
saddle (v.)
impose a task upon, assign a responsibility to;
Synonyms: charge / burden
From wordnet.princeton.edu