Etymology
Advertisement

sadden (v.)

"to make sorrowful," 1620s, from sad (adj.) + -en (1); earlier "to make solid or firm" (c. 1600). The earlier verb was simply sad, from Middle English saden "become weary or indifferent," also "make (something) hard or stiff," from Old English sadian, which also could be the source of the modern verb. The intransitive meaning "to become sorrowful" is from 1718. Related: Saddened; saddening.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of sadden

sadden (v.)
make unhappy;
The news of her death saddened me
sadden (v.)
come to feel sad;
From wordnet.princeton.edu