Etymology
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rude (adj.)

late 13c., "coarse, rough, without finish" (of surfaces), from Old French ruide (13c.) and directly from Latin rudis "rough, crude, unlearned," a word of uncertain etymology, related to rudus "rubble." The usual preferred derivation is that it is from the same source as Latin rufus "red" (see rufous) via a notion of raw ("red") meat, but de Vaan points out "there is not a shimmer of a meaning 'red' in rudis or in rudus 'rubble', so that the supposed shift from 'crude (meat)' > 'crude' rests in the air."

The senses of "ill-mannered, uncultured, boorish; uneducated, ignorant" are from mid-14c.; also of actions or acts, "violent, rough." That of "of low birth or position, common, humble" is from late 14c. The meaning "marked by incivility, contrary to the requirements of courtesy" is perhaps late 14c., certainly by 16c., but difficult to distinguish from earlier "unrefined, uncultured" senses.

Rude boy (also Rudie, for short) in Jamaican slang is attested from 1967. Figurative phrase rude awakening is attested from 1895.

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Definitions of rude

rude (adj.)
(used especially of commodities) being unprocessed or manufactured using only simple or minimal processes;
bales of rude cotton
Synonyms: natural / raw
rude (adj.)
socially incorrect in behavior;
Synonyms: ill-mannered / bad-mannered / unmannered / unmannerly
rude (adj.)
(of persons) lacking in refinement or grace;
Synonyms: ill-bred / bounderish / lowbred / underbred / yokelish
rude (adj.)
belonging to an early stage of technical development; characterized by simplicity and (often) crudeness;
Synonyms: crude / primitive
rude (adj.)
lacking civility or good manners; "want nothing from you but to get away from your uncivil tongue"- Willa Cather;
Synonyms: uncivil
From wordnet.princeton.edu