Etymology
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Words related to rouse

arouse (v.)
1590s, "awaken, stir to action" (transitive), from a- (1) "on" + rouse. Related: Aroused; arousing.
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rabble-rouser (n.)

"demagogue, one who arouses the emotions of a disorderly crowd," 1842, agent noun from rabble-rousing, which is attested by 1802 as an adjective (in Sydney Smith), by 1933 as a noun; see rabble (n.1) + rouse (v.).

rouser (n.)

"one who or that which excites into action," 1610s, agent noun from rouse (v.). Also colloquially, "something exciting or astonishing" (by 1839).

rousing (adj.)

"having the power to excite or astonish," 1640s, present-participle adjective from rouse (v.).

roust (v.)

"raise or arouse, stir up" (from one's bed, etc.), 1650s, probably an alteration of rouse with excrescent -t. Related: Rousted; rousting.

row (n.2)

"noisy commotion," 1746, Cambridge student slang, of uncertain origin, perhaps related to rousel "drinking bout" (c. 1600), a shortened form of carousal. Klein suggests a back-formation from rouse (n.), mistaken as a plural (compare pea from pease).