Etymology
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roundhouse (n.)

also round-house, mid-15c., "lockup, place of imprisonment, a guarded building" (a sense now obsolete), from Dutch rondhuis "guardhouse;" see round (adj.) + house (n.). The U.S. railroading sense of "circular shed for locomotives with a turntable in the center" is from 1856. In pugilism, in reference to a blow delivered with a wide sweep of the arm (by 1920); in baseball of a sidearm pitch (by 1910), both perhaps extended from the mechanical sense of "round building for machinery worked by circular movement."

updated on October 07, 2021

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