Etymology
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Words related to rondel

round (adj., adv.)

c. 1300 (early 13c. as a surname), "spherical in shape; circular in outline," of persons or animals, "well-fed;" from Anglo-French rounde, Old French roont (12c., Modern French rond), probably originally *redond, from Vulgar Latin *retundus (source also of Provençal redon, Spanish redondo, Old Italian ritondo), from Latin rotundus "like a wheel, circular, round," related to rota "wheel" (see rotary). The French word is the source of Middle Dutch ront (Dutch rond), Middle High German runt (German rund) and similar words in the Germanic languages. 

As an adverb from c. 1300. As a preposition from c. 1600, "so as to make a complete circuit" (as in round the world); 1715 as "throughout, all through" (as in round the clock); by 1743 as "so as to make a turn or partial circuit about" (as in round the corner). In many cases it is a shortened form of around (adv.).

Of numbers from mid-14c., "entire, full, complete, brought to completion," with the notion of symmetry extended to that of completeness. Round number for one only approximately correct, usually expressed in 10s, 100s, etc., is by 1640s. Compare round (v.). Round trip "an outward and return journey" is by 1844, originally of railways. A round-dance (1520s) is one in which the dancers move in a circle or ring. Round heels attested from 1926, in reference to incompetent boxers, 1927 in reference to loose women, implying in either case a tendency to end up flat on one's back.

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rondeau (n.)

"a short poem in fixed form; a metrical form of 10 or 13 lines with but two rhymes," 1520s, from French rondeau, from Old French rondel "short poem" (see rondel). "In Flanders Fields" and "Jenny Kiss'd Me" are notable English examples.

rondo (n.)

"musical composition of one principal theme, which is repeated at least once," 1797, from Italian rondo, from French rondeau, rondel, from Old French rondel "little round" (see rondel).

roundelay (n.)

"song in which a line or refrain is continually repeated," 1570s, from French rondelet, diminutive of rondel "short poem with a refrain," literally "small circle," diminutive of Old French rond "circle, sphere," originally an adjective from roont (see round (adj.), and compare rondel). With spelling assimilated to lay (n.1) "poem to be sung."