Etymology
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rob (v.)

late 12c., robben, "steal, take away (from someone) unlawfully; plunder or strip (a place) by force or violence," from Old French rober "rob, steal, pillage, ransack, rape," from West Germanic *rauba "booty" (source also of Old High German roubon "to rob," roub "spoil, plunder;" Old English reafian, source of the reave in bereave), from Proto-Germanic *raubon "to rob" (from PIE *runp- "to break;" see corrupt (adj.)).

Lord, hou schulde God approve þat þou robbe Petur, and gif þis robbere to Poule in þe name of Crist? [Wyclif, c. 1380]

To rob the cradle is attested from 1864 in reference to drafting young men in the American Civil War; by 1949 in reference to seductions or romantic relationships with younger persons. Related: Robbed; robbing.

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Definitions of rob

rob (v.)
take something away by force or without the consent of the owner;
The burglars robbed him of all his money
rob (v.)
rip off; ask an unreasonable price;
Synonyms: overcharge / soak / surcharge / gazump / fleece / plume / pluck / hook
From wordnet.princeton.edu