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ripple (v.)

early 15c., riplen, "to crease, wrinkle;" 1660s, "to present a ruffled surface," of obscure origin, perhaps a frequentative of rip (v.), and compare rip (n.2) and rumple. Transitive sense, in reference to the surface of water, "cause to ripple, agitate lightly," is from 1786. Related: Rippled; rippling.

ripple (n.)

"very small wave," 1798, from earlier meaning "stretch of shallow, rippling water" (1755), from ripple (v.). The meaning "light ruffling of the surface suggestive of a ripple" is from 1843.

The meaning "ice cream streaked with colored syrup" is attested by 1939, so called from its appearance. In reference to the rings in water from a dropped pebble, by 1884. As the name of a brand of inexpensive wine sold by E&J Gallo Winery, from 1960 to 1984. In geology, ripple-mark "wavy surface on sand formed by wind or water" is by 1833. Ripple effect "continuous spreading results of an event or action" is from 1950.

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Definitions of ripple from WordNet
1
ripple (v.)
stir up (water) so as to form ripples;
Synonyms: ruffle / riffle / cockle / undulate
ripple (v.)
flow in an irregular current with a bubbling noise;
Synonyms: babble / guggle / burble / bubble / gurgle
2
ripple (n.)
a small wave on the surface of a liquid;
Synonyms: rippling / riffle / wavelet
ripple (n.)
(electronics) an oscillation of small amplitude imposed on top of a steady value;
From wordnet.princeton.edu