Etymology
Advertisement

remove (v.)

early 14c., remouven, remuvien, remēven, "take (something) away; dismiss" from an office, post or situation; from Old French removoir "move, stir; leave, depart; take away," from Latin removere "move back or away, take away, put out of view, subtract," from re- "back, away" (see re-) + movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

Sense of "go away, leave, depart, move" from a position occupied is from late 14c.; the intransitive sense of "change (one's) place, move from one place to another" also is from 14c. Related: Removed; removing.

remove (n.)

1550s, "act of removing" (a person, from office, etc.); 1580s, "change of place;" from remove (v.). Sense of "distance or space by which any thing is removed from another" is attested from 1620s.

updated on June 29, 2021

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of remove from WordNet
1
remove (v.)
remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract;
remove a threat
remove a wrapper
Synonyms: take / take away / withdraw
remove (v.)
remove from a position or an office;
remove (v.)
dispose of;
Synonyms: get rid of
remove (v.)
cause to leave;
Synonyms: take out / move out
remove (v.)
shift the position or location of, as for business, legal, educational, or military purposes;
He removed his children to the countryside
remove a case to another court
Synonyms: transfer
remove (v.)
go away or leave;
Synonyms: absent
remove (v.)
kill intentionally and with premeditation;
Synonyms: murder / slay / hit / dispatch / bump off / off / polish off
remove (v.)
get rid of something abstract;
The death of her mother removed the last obstacle to their marriage
Synonyms: take away
2
remove (n.)
degree of figurative distance or separation;
just one remove from madness
it imitates at many removes a Shakespearean tragedy
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.