Etymology
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remand (v.)

mid-15c., remaunden, "to send (something) back," from Anglo-French remaunder, Old French remander "send for again" (12c.) or directly from Late Latin remandare "to send back word, repeat a command," from Latin re- "back" (see re-) + mandare "to consign, order, commit to one's charge" (see mandate (n.)).

The meaning "command or order to go back to a place" is by 1580s. Specifically in law, "send back (a prisoner) on refusing his application for discharge," by 1640s. Related: Remanded; remanding; remandment.

updated on June 27, 2021

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