Etymology
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Words related to radiate

radius (n.)

1590s, "cross-shaft, straight rod or bar," from Latin radius "staff, stake, rod; spoke of a wheel; ray of light, beam of light; radius of a circle," a word of unknown origin. Perhaps related to radix "root," but de Vaan finds that "unlikely." The classical plural is radii

The geometric sense of "straight line drawn from the center of a circle to the circumference" is recorded from 1650s. Meaning "circular area of defined distance around some place" is attested from 1853. As the name of the shorter of the two bones of the forearm from 1610s in English (the Latin word had been used thus by the Romans).

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irradiate (v.)
c. 1600, "to cast beams of light upon," from Latin irradiatus, past participle of irradiare "shine forth, beam upon, illumine," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + radiare "to shine" (see radiate (v.)). Meaning "expose to radiation other than light" (originally X-rays) is from 1901. Related: Irradiated; irradiating.
radiative (adj.)
"having a tendency to radiate," 1820, from radiate (v.) + -ive. Related: Radiativity.
radiator (n.)

1832, "any thing which radiates," agent noun in Latin form from radiate (v.). Originally a stove-like apparatus, as a device designed to communicate heat from steam to a room by 1855; the sense of "cooling device in an internal combustion engine" is by 1899.

radio- 
word-forming element meaning 1. "ray, ray-like" (see radius); 2. "radial, radially" (see radial (adj.)); 3. "by means of radiant energy" (see radiate (v.)); 4. "radioactive" (see radioactive); 5. "by radio" (see radio (n.)).