Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to race

err (v.)
c. 1300, from Old French errer "go astray, lose one's way; make a mistake; transgress," from Latin errare "wander, go astray," figuratively "be in error," from PIE root *ers- (1) "be in motion, wander around" (source also of Sanskrit arsati "flows;" Old English ierre "angry; straying;" Old Frisian ire "angry;" Old High German irri "angry," irron "astray;" Gothic airziþa "error; deception;" the Germanic words reflecting the notion of anger as a "straying" from normal composure). Related: Erred; erring.
Advertisement
arms race (n.)
1930, in reference to naval build-ups, from arms (see arm (n.2)) + race (n.1). First used in British English.
foot-race (n.)
1660s, from foot (n.) + race (n.1).
horse-race (n.)
also horserace, 1580s, from horse (n.) + race (n.1). Related: Horse-racing.
mill-race (n.)

"current of water that drives a mill-wheel," late 15c., from mill (n.1) + race (n.1) in the "current" sense.

moonrace (n.)
also moon race, "national rivalry to be first to send humans to the moon," 1963, from moon (n.) + race (n.1).
race-course (n.)

1764, "plot of ground laid out for horse racing," usually elliptical and with accommodations for participants and spectators, from race (n.1) + course (n.). Meaning "canal along which water is conveyed to or from a water wheel" is by 1841.

race-horse (n.)

"horse bred or kept for running in contests," 1620s, from race (n.1) + horse (n.).

race-track (n.)

"a race-course, the path over which a race is run," 1814, from race (n.1) + track (n.).

raceway (n.)

1828, "artificial passage for water flowing from a fall or dam," from race (n.3) + way (n.). Meaning "automobile race course" is by 1936, from race (n.1).