Etymology
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Words related to quasar

quasi- 

word-forming element used since 18c. (but most productively in 20c.), "kind of, like but not really, as if," expressing some resemblance but implying a degree of fictitious or unreal quality or lack of some important feature; from Latin quasi "as if, as it were" (see quasi).

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stellar (adj.)
1650s, "pertaining to stars, star-like," from Late Latin stellaris "pertaining to a star, starry," from stella "star," from PIE *sterla-, suffixed form of root *ster- (2) "star." Meaning "outstanding, leading" (1883) is from the theatrical sense of star.
*kwo- 
also *kwi-, Proto-Indo-European root, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns.

It forms all or part of: cheese (n.2) "a big thing;" cue (n.1) "stage direction;" either; hidalgo; how; kickshaw; neither; neuter; qua; quality; quandary; quantity; quasar; quasi; quasi-; query; quib; quibble; quiddity; quidnunc; quip; quodlibet; quondam; quorum; quote; quotidian; quotient; ubi; ubiquity; what; when; whence; where; whether; which; whither; who; whoever; whom; whose; why.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit kah "who, which;" Avestan ko, Hittite kuish "who;" Latin quis/quid "in what respect, to what extent; how, why," qua "where, which way," qui/quae/quod "who, which;" Lithuanian kas "who;" Old Church Slavonic kuto, Russian kto "who;" Old Irish ce, Welsh pwy "who;" Old English hwa, hwæt, hwær, etc.
pulsar (n.)

"highly magnetized, rotating compact star that emits beams of electromagnetic radiation," 1968, from pulse (n.1), the form on analogy of quasar. When discovered in 1967 via radio telescope, they were thought perhaps to be signals from alien civilizations and astronomers informally dubbed them LGM for "Little Green Men."