Advertisement

put-out (adj.)

"offended, angry, upset," by 1887, from the verbal phrase in the sense of "offend," attested by 1822; see put (v.) + out (adv.). Perhaps via the earlier sense of "cause to lose self-possession, disconcert" (1580s). The verbal phrase is from mid-14c. as "drive out, banish, exile;" from 1520s as "extinguish" (a fire or burning object). To put out, of a woman, "to offer oneself for sex" is attested by 1947.

Others are reading

Advertisement