Advertisement

purport (n.)

early 15c., "meaning, tenor, the surface or expressed meaning of a document, etc.; that which is conveyed or expressed," from Anglo-French purport (late 13c.), Old French porport "contents, tenor," back-formation from purporter "to contain, convey, carry; intend," from pur- (from Latin pro- "forth;" see pur-) + Old French porter "to carry," from Latin portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). Meaning "that which is to be done or effected" is from 1650s.

purport (v.)

1520s, "indicate, express, set forth, convey to the mind as the meaning or thing intended," from the noun in English and from Anglo-French purporter (c. 1300), from Old French purporter "to contain, convey, carry; intend," from pur- (from Latin pro- "forth;" see pur-) + Old French porter "to carry," from Latin portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). Related: Purported; purporting.

Others are reading

Advertisement
Definitions of purport from WordNet
1
purport (v.)
have the often specious appearance of being, intending, or claiming;
The letter purports to express people's opinion
purport (v.)
propose or intend;
Synonyms: aim / purpose / propose
2
purport (n.)
the intended meaning of a communication;
Synonyms: intent / spirit
purport (n.)
the pervading meaning or tenor;
Synonyms: drift
From wordnet.princeton.edu