Etymology
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Words related to puritan

purity (n.)

c. 1200, purite, "freedom from moral contamination, sinlessness, innocence; righteousness; chastity," from Old French purete "simple truth," earlier purte (12c., Modern French pureté), from Late Latin puritatem (nominative puritas) "cleanness, pureness," from Latin purus "clean, pure, unmixed; chaste, undefiled" (see pure (adj.)). From mid-15c. as "freedom from admixture or adulteration."

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Impuritan (n.)
"one who is not a Puritan," 1610s, a hostile coinage of the Puritans, from im- "not, opposite of" + Puritan, perhaps also with suggestion of impure.
puritanical (adj.)

c. 1600, "pertaining to the Puritans or to their doctrines or practices," from Puritan + -ical. Chiefly in disparaging use, "rigid in religious or moral matters." Related: Puritanically.

Puritanism (n.)

"strictness of religious life," 1570s, from Puritan + -ism. Originally in reference to specific doctrines and practices; from 1590s of excessive moral strictness generally. In this last sense it was famously defined by H.L. Mencken (1920) as "the haunting fear that someone, somewhere may be happy."